There is no moment of completion, in this life, when all of the moments of terror, boredom, worry, and ecstasy merge on a plateau on which the balance of our lives will be lived . . . we should be resigned that it will continue to be a mix of fear and contentment.

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About the Author

Albert Norton, Jr. is an essayist and novelist, who blogs on issues of culture and philosophy as it affects religion. His first novel was Another Like Me (eLectio Publishing 2015). This is a book of adventure, but it is also a book about man’s consciousness; that of each person to the other, and about the Consciousness that surrounds us all. It is about war and peace and the truth of what we are without God, and with Him. His second novel is Rough Water Baptism (eLectio Publishing 2017), about the difficult re-enchantment of the world for one young woman who has all the material advantages one could hope for, but who begins adulthood in a spiritual desert.

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Apostrophe Abuse             I have affirmative proof of the imminent collapse of civilization.  In Britain there was something called “The Apostrophe Protection Society.”  They just announced:  “We, and our many supporters worldwide, have done our best but the ignorance and laziness present in modern times have won.”  In case you think I make this stuff […]

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The Mind               Friday’s (11/22/10) Wall Street Journal article by Robert Lee Holtz:  Music’s Universal Pull Studied by Algorithm.  Turns out there are some “universal patterns” in music, even correcting for biases of culture, perception, and the findings appearing in Western scholarship.  Music apparently has “bedeviled” Darwinian biologists.  Luke Glowacki of Pennsylvania State University […]

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A few years ago I commented on a book by philosopher Edward Feser titled The Last Superstition.  Feser laid out the reasoning of ancient philosophers, emphasizing Aristotle, showing how the existence of physical things pointed unmistakeably to a non-physical reality behind it.  Feser’s book ended with a saying attributed to Confuscious:  when the finger points […]

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